Angelo Stavrow [dot] Blog

elsewhere

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • According to this study, it turns out that you're more likely to feel passion for your work if you believe that pssion comes from pursuing important, rather than enjoyable, work.
  • ”'Your best self' is a mirage that capitalism created to make you feel inadequate, so that you buy more stuff. Forget about it. Hang up the phone. Let's work with this self, the one that's right here, right now. […] Let's let go of all that striving, and plant the seeds for something new. What will you nourish and grow in the coming year, and how will you share your essence?” — excellent closing remarks from Jocelyn K. Glei's latest (final?) episode of the Hurry Slowly podcast.
  • Breathe in through your heart, breathe out through your heart feels more focused as a breathing exercise. (H/T Pratik)
  • Diverse teams can build products with significantly less shit-face.
  • This Twitter thread is triggering my need for symmetry, but it's also pretty hilarious.

#elsewhere

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • “A consumer co-op’s biggest advantage is its refusal to play by traditional corporate rules. Co-ops not only keep more money in the communities where they are active, they create a more direct link between labour and capital that isn’t always present in privately held businesses. [...] In other words, being a co-op wasn’t how MEC ended up losing its competitive edge—forgetting that fact was the problem.”
  • I love this idea of centripetal vs. centrifugal books. Both types are important — and I think that it applies to many forms of art, too.
  • ”'Cancel' and 'woke' are the latest terms to originate in Black culture only to be appropriated into the White mainstream and subsequently thrashed to death,” explains Clyde McGrady in this Washington Post op-ed.
  • Nearly two-thirds of anti-vaccine disinformation on social media is shared by a dozen influencers — and those platforms fail to act on 95% of it.
  • This Twitter thread shares some astonishing comparisons on how quickly Chris Sharma dominated his athletic field, rock climbing.

#elsewhere

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • Universal health care is a fundamental human right, but it has to come hand-in-hand with accessibility to be truly universal. Quebec has a long way to go.
  • This Twitter thread tries to describe what systemic racism feels like to folks that have never experienced it.
  • No, we don’t really swallow spiders in our sleep.
  • If you really want to understand a subject, it’s not enough to read about it — you also have to read around it.
  • As a sometimes-photographer, I understand both the value of, and the sheer work involved in, culling a set of photos down to the “keepers.” Some now offer their photo-curating skill to the general public.”
  • And what's much more concerning, quite frankly, is [Tesla] are using consumers, bystanders, other passengers, pedestrians, and bicyclists as lab rats for an experiment for which none of these people signed up.”

#elsewhere

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

#elsewhere

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • We Hate You Now is an op-ed exploring the feelings developing amongst people who've worked and sacrificed to slow down the spread of COVID-19, and what happens when they meet those that didn't.
  • Related to the above, an empirical report suggests that “lower levels of empathy and higher levels of Callousness, Deceitfulness, and Risk-taking are associated with lower compliance with [COVID-19] containment measures” like mask wearing and physical distancing.
  • We don't have children, so it somehow never occurred to me that the concept of affordable daycare is foreign to people outside of Quebec. It's not a perfect system, but this op-ed puts forward a strong argument for how it helps bring tenderness and compassion to communities.
  • “Don't scale past the number of users you can excellently serve” is one of the best mantras I've read in a very long time.
  • While I'd like to believe that fast fashion is dying, the fact remains that craft labour —which you absolutely should support, if you can— is priced way out of reach of the average person. Ethical consumption is, unfortunately, for the privileged.
  • Speaking of fashion and style, this thread on why you look like shit in your clothes shines a light on a) the outsized impact of low-cost alterations, and b) the value of finding your neighbourhood alterations guru.
  • Because I'm a sucker for methodologies: Johnny.Decimal is an interesting Dewey decimal system-like approach for organizing projects (H/T Jack).
  • This Glitch app customizes a Ron Miller-inspired practice guide for your craft.

#elsewhere

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • This Twitter thread shared an important reflection on the universality of pain, as well as the universality of how we run from pain, individually and collectively. (H/T Cassey)
  • Some musings by Simon Willison on running office hours on open-source projects as a way to combat the feeling of “publishing software into the void”, getting feedback from those using your project, and potentially generating some revenue for the project as well.
  • Turns out, the “mayday” distress call comes from the French phrase «m'aider» (“help me”). (H/T Katelyn Thomas)
  • Alexithymia is the condition of not being able to express emotional feelings as words or images. Not being able to do so leads to harmful physiological effects; it is “the development of this capacity – the psychic elaboration of emotion – that leads, quite literally, to continued mental growth.”

#elsewhere

I kicked off a new weekly “development diary” series on Dev.to today.

This post is an entry in a weekly development diary on building a feed-aggregator-based blog on Glitch. Only a small part of building an app is code; the bulk of your time is spent planning, experimenting, making mistakes, getting frustrated, and making progress in baby steps.

You can read the first post here. The goal is to build a web app that takes as input an OPML file of your RSS feeds across various platforms, and automagically generates a blog with its own “firehose” RSS feed with that content.

I really found it helpful when I journaled daily while rewriting my iOS app. I hope you find it interesting too.

#glitch #devto #elsewhere

I was invited to chat with [Anil Dash] about tech and self-care on the Function podcast's season 2 kickoff. Function examines the intersection of tech and culture, and I'm grateful to have been invited to share my thoughts.

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A couple of months ago, [Glitch] CEO [Anil Dash] got to interview Mindy Kaling at Twilio's [SIGNAL conference]. We built an [app] that let people text in their questions for Mindy, and it added a lot of fun interactivity to their chat!

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