Angelo Stavrow [dot] Blog

Missives and musings on a variety of topics.

💉 Applying bugfix_pfizer_1.patch

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • “A motorist might take issue with losing parking space or driving privileges on certain arteries across the city, but they would also gain a vibrant, more engaged streetscape (with less than five minutes added to their commute). When we make sidewalks safer for the elderly in the winter, they become safer for everyone else, including parents with strollers or people in wheelchairs.” — When Cities Are Built for White Men
  • “Three Stars By Default” feels like a very reasonable default for approaching everything, balancing cynicism against fandom.
  • It's not just here — the flu has virtually disappeared worldwide due to the measures put in place to contain COVID-19.
  • This Twitter thread holds some fascinating learnings from having kept a gratitude journal for nearly three years.

#elsewhere

Three iPhones sitting on a bed of smooth riverstones, showing various screens of the Thought Detox iPhone app.

It's been interesting to watch the sales of the Thought Detox iPhone app since it launched in mid-February. It followed the same launch-day-spike-to-long-tail curve that most all iOS apps experience, and while I didn't expect it to be something that would be bring in life-changing money, it hasn't sold quite as well as I'd hoped either.

(In case you're interested, I share my sales numbers on the first Wednesday of the month on the company blog, which is also available as a newsletter.)

I'm sure there are a tonne of reasons for this. Certainly, part of it is that this is a very niche app. And maybe part of it is that it's a paid app. And maybe part of it is that it's priced too high for its current feature set, given that it's only available on iPhone.

So I'm trying a little pricing experiment: for the month of May, Thought Detox is on sale! That means you get the app for US$1.99 instead of US$2.99, or about 33% off (though the exact savings will depend on the currency where you live).

We'll see how that goes, and I'll share the results in the June business update!

Yesterday, on my Write.as/WriteFreely-related blog, I wrote about holding office hours for anyone wanting to contribute to the WriteFreely Swift projects I maintain. Check it out!

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • I'm worried about post-factual democracy. This article suggests how we might re-establish trust (hint: as always, it involves transparency).
  • While I've been focusing most of my time lately on iOS/Swift development and writing, I also specialize in being a generalist.
  • Procrastination is not laziness, it's a coping mechanism for dealing with negative emotions. There's even more on the topic in this excellent Life Kit interview.
  • I can't stop thinking about this tweet by my pal and former colleague Margarita Noriega:

“Metrics are not goals. And goals are not values. Ask yourself today: does your work reflect your values, or a goal, or a metric?”

#elsewhere

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • Ian's Awesome Counter is an app for Apple Watch to help you stay on task. I love the story on how how father and son teamed up to develop this.
  • I came across the idea of topic journals and I love it: individual journals meant purely for your thoughts on a given topic.
  • I'm trying to go deeper on my reading, and this article on how to learn and retain technical knowledge has a lot of great tips.
  • Turns Out: Québec “likes to think of itself as a generous society capable of great social solidarity”, but as this sociologist points out, the pandemic has proven much of how we think of ourselves to be false.
  • Watch This: Iron Maiden's “Fear of the Dark”, arranged for symphony orchestra, and performed remotely by 160 musicians around the world.

#elsewhere

The topic of “do what you love, and you'll never work a day in your life” has been popping up on my Twitter timeline again lately.

Read more...

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • According to this study, it turns out that you're more likely to feel passion for your work if you believe that pssion comes from pursuing important, rather than enjoyable, work.
  • ”'Your best self' is a mirage that capitalism created to make you feel inadequate, so that you buy more stuff. Forget about it. Hang up the phone. Let's work with this self, the one that's right here, right now. […] Let's let go of all that striving, and plant the seeds for something new. What will you nourish and grow in the coming year, and how will you share your essence?” — excellent closing remarks from Jocelyn K. Glei's latest (final?) episode of the Hurry Slowly podcast.
  • Breathe in through your heart, breathe out through your heart feels more focused as a breathing exercise. (H/T Pratik)
  • Diverse teams can build products with significantly less shit-face.
  • This Twitter thread is triggering my need for symmetry, but it's also pretty hilarious.

#elsewhere

I updated the time format on my iPhone to 24-hour time, and doing so put all of the third-party apps on my phone into the “Other” category of the App Library. 🤷🏻‍♂️

Elsewhere is a series of interesting things I came across during the week, published every Sunday.

  • “A consumer co-op’s biggest advantage is its refusal to play by traditional corporate rules. Co-ops not only keep more money in the communities where they are active, they create a more direct link between labour and capital that isn’t always present in privately held businesses. [...] In other words, being a co-op wasn’t how MEC ended up losing its competitive edge—forgetting that fact was the problem.”
  • I love this idea of centripetal vs. centrifugal books. Both types are important — and I think that it applies to many forms of art, too.
  • ”'Cancel' and 'woke' are the latest terms to originate in Black culture only to be appropriated into the White mainstream and subsequently thrashed to death,” explains Clyde McGrady in this Washington Post op-ed.
  • Nearly two-thirds of anti-vaccine disinformation on social media is shared by a dozen influencers — and those platforms fail to act on 95% of it.
  • This Twitter thread shares some astonishing comparisons on how quickly Chris Sharma dominated his athletic field, rock climbing.

#elsewhere